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Country Display
By: Catharine Niuzzo Honaman


Time: Two to six days, depending on how long the resolution writing lesson takes

 


Abstract
The students will take the diverse information collected from their work in the library and in their science, social studies, math, and English classes and create visual displays. The purpose of these displays is to make the extensive facts and complex issues of each nation clearly accessible to other students.

Objectives
1. Students will research and synthesize materials to create displays that showcase the natural resources, geographical features, political make-up, and economic status of their country.
2. Students will identify pertinent information in a visual and written format, which features the pertinent characteristics of their country.
3. Students will create a visually appealing display containing accurate and extensive information on
their country which other students will be able to understand with ease.
4. Students will clearly indicate the dominant issues facing their country within their display.

Standards
VIEWING and PRESENTING
VP-P1. Analyze and evaluate visual media for language, subject matter, and visual techniques
used to influence attitudes, decision making, and cultural perceptions.
VP-P2. Plan, organize, develop, produce and evaluate an effective multimedia presentation
using tools such as charts, photographs, maps, tables, posters, transparencies, slides,
and electronic media.
VP-P3. Analyze and evaluate the impact of visual media on the intended audience.

Teacher Background

Resource Websites

 

 


Activity
Throughout the quarter students have been researching a specific country, discovering what political, social, and economic issues that country is facing. The students have also been examining the impact of current scientific advancements on such areas as human health, environmental degradation, and agricultural practices. Before students enter classroom have the USA country display partially set up.

Present students with the partially created USA display. It is not the intention that this display be completed, but that students see that they can pull from all their classes to complete this display. Stress to the students that theirs may not look exactly like this one, in fact it should not, it should be more detailed. Ask the students what information they might add to this display to answer the following questions:

1. Explain to students that now it is time for them to share the wealth of information that they have amassed about their country in a format that is both visually appealing and accurate in its presentation of the facts. These country presentations will form a museum walk, which will take place in the eighth week of the unit.

2. Present students with the partially created USA display. It is not the intention that this display be completed, but that students see that they can pull from all their classes to complete this display. Stress to the students that theirs may not look exactly like this one, in fact it should not, it should be more detailed.

3. Ask the students what information they might add to this display to answer the following questions:
1. How is your economic situation in relation to the international community? What factors exist that determine your position?
2. Is access to resources equitable within your own country? What factors are inhibiting access to resources and what can be done about it? (War, drought/famine, trade sanctions, GMF concerns, money, etc.)
3. What are the top two issues that inhibit equality, health, and peace within your country?

If they are having difficulty getting started, ask them what is the general policy about genetically modified foods here in the USA, which of their foods come from genetically modified crops? At the beginning of the unit they have discussed this in science. How might this effect trade policy with other countries? How would they represent that? What is the connection with agricultural output and population.

4. Organize with the librarian time for the students to research further any areas of their portfolio where there are gaps. Permit time for the students to gather additional information that will make their country display as complete as possible.

The country displays will include:
1. a political map
2. a physical map
3. a resource map
4. a world map with your country’s location indicated
5. general statistics
6. current events articles
7. international resource and trade relations visually represented
8. agricultural data
9. pictures of places and people of your country

5. Allow students classroom time to work on their country displays. Displays will be utilized during the forum.

Embedded Assessment
Country displays will be assessed for completeness based on having accurately answered the questions given to the students at the beginning of the quarter:

iv) How is your economic situation in relation to the international community? What factors exist that determine your position?

v) Is access to resources equitable within your own country? What factors are inhibiting access to resources and what can be done about it? (War, drought/famine, trade sanctions, GMF concerns, money, etc.)

vi) What are the top two issues that inhibit equality, health, and peace within your country?

The country displays will also be assessed for how well they present the country information in an organized, visually appealing, easily understandable format.



PULSE is a project of the Community Outreach and Education Program of the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center and is funded by:


an
NIH/NCRR award #16260-01A1
The Community Outreach and Education Program is part of the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center: an NIEHS Award

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Supported by NIEHS grant # ES06694


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