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Time to Read
Author: Catharine Niuzzo Honaman


Time: 4 classes
Preparation Time: 1 hour to read lesson and to make copies of the matrix
Materials: A copy of the matrix for each student: Time to Read


Abstract
During the four days of this lesson students will read the book they have chosen which concerns the impact of disease on a culture, fill out a matrix developed in history class which outlines the effects of the disease on various areas of the culture, and gather information for the five paragraph theme. This is the explore lesson. Students will read the book of their choice noting significant information about the effects of a certain disease on the community described in the literature.


Objectives
Students will be able to:
1. Identify how the literary elements of theme, point of view, characterization, setting, and plot illustrate the effects of a certain disease on a community.
2. Identify the aspects of the book that are specific to the community/culture in its plot or setting;
3. Read with understanding the book of their choice.

National English Education Standards
Standard #1
Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world, to acquire new information, to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace, and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

Arizona State Standards
READING
Strand 2: Concept 1: Elements of Literature
PO 1. Analyze the author’s use of literary elements:

  • theme
  • point of view
  • characterization
  • setting
  • plot

Strand 2: Concept 2: Functional Text
PO 1. Describe the historical and cultural aspects found in cross-cultural works of literature.

Teacher Background
In order to be a helpful moderator and an effective evaluator it is important to have an understanding of each of the books that the students are reading. You may wish to skim the various books as the students read them in class and look up additional critical information on each of the novels.

 

 

Activity
1. Ask the students to remember a time when they themselves have been very sick, such as with a bad case of the flu or even something much worse, or when a family member or close friend has been gravely ill. Have them write down all the ways being terribly sick affected their lives. What were the obvious physical symptoms and perhaps the emotional repercussions? What was the social impact? Was there a financial impact on the student’s family? Were there other areas of life affected such as spiritual, artistic, or political? If students are comfortable with this topic ask them to briefly share their answers with the class.

2. Give the students the rest of class and the week to carefully read the book they have chosen, filling in the matrix, which is a format they have already used in history class. Each student will need to take notes on how each of the literary elements of theme, point of view, characterization, setting, and plot illustrate the effects a certain disease has on a community , writing down quotes to be used in his or her five paragraph theme. You may need to review these elements of theme with the students.

3. Inform students that they should each take notes to identify examples in his or her book of how the specific time in history and the culture described have been altered or changed by the disease in the story.

4. If any student is not able to complete the work of this lesson in the four allotted classroom periods, they need to use time beyond class to finish their work so that they are prepared on Monday of the following week to present their matrix. This lesson does not have a discreet closure activity; its actual closure is the work to be done in the explain and apply lessons.

Homework
If any student is not able to complete the work of this lesson in the four allotted classroom periods they need to use time beyond class to finish their work so that they are prepared on Monday of the following week to present their matrix.

Embedded Assessment
Student work may be evaluated by looking at the quality and quantity of answers from the engagement activity and the matrix. You may wish not to grade the matrix until after lesson #3 or to give points based on effort alone at this time.

 



PULSE is a project of the Community Outreach and Education Program of the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center and is funded by:


an
NIH/NCRR award #16260-01A1
The Community Outreach and Education Program is part of the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center: an NIEHS Award

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Supported by NIEHS grant # ES06694


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Last update: November 10, 2009
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