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Fertilizers, Pesticides and Human Health- American Lessons

Big Idea
Migration defines America! Movement from place to place plays a strong role in the United States. American history is about the people who have been forced to move against their will as well as the people who voluntarily moved in their quest for survival or a better life.
Essential Question
Historically, why do people move to live elsewhere? Do they all have choices?
Learning Cycle
Lesson Title & Description
Objective
Students will:
Class period & week
Engage
What is migration?
Migration is defined. Concepts like voluntary, and push and pull factors are also investigates.
1. Through individual research and shared class discussion students will be able to identify the difference between forced and voluntary migration.

2. While workingin pairs students will identify if push and pull factors are caused by political, social, economic, or environmental influences.

Week 1- 1-2
class periods

Explore/Explain
American Migrations Timeline.
The U.S. is often defined as a country of immigrants but a more appropriate way to state it would be that we are a country of migrants. Exploring migration in America.

1. Create a list of migrations in America applying prior knowledge and textbook research

2. Conduct individual research of a particular episode of migration and write a two-page essay communicating their findings.

3. A matrix of student research will be compiled from student presentations of their research.

Week 1 & 2
6 class periods
Apply
A Country of Migrants.
Differentiation between immigrants and Migrants is made.
List reasons in support or rejection of the United States being a country of migrants through a written statement and discussion.
Week 2 -1
Class period

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Big Idea
Forced Migration of the Native populations! The government's need for land and resources led to government enforcements putting Native American communities in the U.S. into mandatory reserved lands, imposing how they should use that land, and forcing their children to attend government run boarding schools.
Essential Question
Why are the Native American reservations?
Learning Cycle
Lesson Title & Description
Objective
Students will:
Class period & week
Engage
This land is my land, that land is your land!
The movement of the Native populations begins.
Define and describe reservation and the relationship between the U.S. Government and Native tribes through individual textbook research and class discussion.
Week 2-1
class period
Explore/Explain
Forced to move in more ways than one.
The Indian Removal Act (1830), Dawes Act, and the Boarding Schools.
1. Identify the reasons for a particular episode of Indian movement by conducting individual research amd writing a report.

2. Create a Venn diagram using group research materials.
Week 3 & 4-6
class periods
Apply
Changing Opinions
Sudents reflect on how their ideas of the Native American experience might have changed after the lessons learned.
Compare their preconceptions of Native American movement with their current perceptions and identify why they have changed.
Week 4-2
class periods

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Big Idea
Voluntary Migration in order to survive the Depression by looking for alternative jobs and lodging. Understanding the Depression, including the Dust Bowl, and how people migrated from job to job, to and from cities, and from their farms as they were pushed by economic and environmental factors to abandon their homes and farms in a quest for work, food and lodging.
Essential Question
What are the environmental factors that led to the Dust Bowl?
Learning Cycle
Lesson Title & Description
Objective
Students will:
Class period & week
Engage
Brother, can you spare a dime?
Introduction to the Great Depression.
Through song analysis and group discussion, students will identify the qualities that represented the Great Depression.
Week 4-2
class periods
Explore
Economic Crash and Recovery!
The Great Depression and the New Deal initiatives.
1. Compile research notes on the Great Depression through library and internet research that will help them identify why it occurred and how it affected people.

2. Students will individually research a New Deal policy and then orally present their findings to the class in order to create a class matrix on the different New Deal policies of the Great Depression.
Week 5-5
class periods
Explain
I have a Story to tell!
RAFT Activity on the depression and the dust bowl to relate how the depression affected people's lives.
Using the RAFT learning strategy, students will write a story reflective of an individual from the period of the Great Depression. Analyze the story by addressing whether the RAFT writing guidelines have been met.
Weeks 6-2
6 days
Apply
Finding Patterns in Times of Crisis
Social, Political, Economic, and Environmental factors of the Great Depression and how they could have been avoided are addressed.
Work in collaborative groups to develop a mind map or web identifying cocnepts and examples that succinctly illustrate the Great Depression always applying what they have learned in previous lessons.
Week 6-2
class periods

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Big Idea
Marginalized Laborers and the Migrant Field Workers. Workers fight for equal rights that address safer working and living conditions with a strong feature on Migrant field workers, the UFW movement, and pesticide awareness.
Essential Question
How can exploitation of the migrant worker compromise their health?
Learning Cycle
Lesson Title & Description
Objective
Students will:
Class period & week
Engage
Voluntary International Migrants and Unions.
Miners fight for human and work related rights set the pace for later movements like that of the field migrant workers.
Students will document information about the UMWA and black lung disease through class discussion of relevant readings.
Week 7 -1-2
class periods
Explore
The United Farm Workers and Pesticides. Cesar Chavez, Dolores Huerta and the creation of the UFW.
Answer a series of research questions through internet research.
Write a brief history of the UFW using research notes compiled.
Create resumes of Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta by conducting biography research.
Weeks 7 - 4
class periods
Explain
Finding a Voice
Cesar Chavez the speech maker and Dolores Huerta the lobbyist.
1. Analyze speeches and articles by outlining their content.

2. Create a list of dominant themes used in speech and article writing through class discussion and participation.
Week 8-2
class periods
Apply
Finding your Voice
Writing a speech and slogan in support of a current pesticide awareness month.
Write a speech and create a slogan through analysis of current issues articles dealing with pesticide use.
Weeks 8-2
class periods

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PULSE is a project of the Community Outreach and Education Program of the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center and is funded by:


an
NIH/NCRR award #16260-01A1
The Community Outreach and Education Program is part of the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center: an NIEHS Award

LOGO - SWEHSC
LOGO - NIEHS Center LOGO - NIEHS

Supported by NIEHS grant # ES06694


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Last update: November 10, 2009
  Page Content: Rachel Hughes
Web Master: Travis Biazo