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Refining Your Public Speaking Skills

Author: Catharine Niuzzo Honaman
With content adapted from the following web sites:
http://www.toastmasters.org/tips.asp 10 Tips for Successful Public Speaking
http://www.speechgems.com/persuaders.html A Guide to Persuasive Speech Techniques
http://www.eduref.org/cgi-bin/printlessons.cgi/Virtual/Lessons/Language_Arts/Speech/SPH
Delivering a Persuasive Speech
http://www.studyguide.org/cm101_persuasive_speech.html
A study guide for organizing a
persuasive speech



Time: 4 classes
Preparation
Time:
30 minutes to read lesson
Materials: Rubric from Explore Lesson
Each student needs his or her position paper

 


Abstract
In the previous two lessons the students established the behaviors, techniques, and practices that lead to a presentation being successfully persuasive when given in a formal governmental hearing. This lesson gives students time to work their position papers, from the previous learning cycle, into effective oral presentations. These will be practiced with their peers in preparation for the Apply Lesson and the final project of this unit which will be conducted through the government class.

Purpose – This is the Explain Lesson. Students will create an oral presentation based on their position papers from the previous learning cycle.

Objectives
Students will be able to:
1. Students will be able to use the rubric created in the Explore Lesson to help them craft an effective oral presentation worthy of a formal governmental hearing.
2. Students will polish their oral presentations that are based on their position papers through guided practice with their peers.

Standards
LISTENING AND SPEAKING
Standard 3: Students will effectively listen and speak in situations that serve different
purposes and involve a variety of audiences.

Teacher Background
It would be very helpful to read the lessons on public speaking from the ninth grade unit language arts units, especially The Three Appeals in Rhetoric and The Powers of Persuasion.

Resource Websites
http://www.toastmasters.org/tips.asp 10 Tips for Successful Public Speaking
http://www.speechgems.com/persuaders.html A Guide to Persuasive Speech Techniques
http://www.eduref.org/cgi-bin/printlessons.cgi/Virtual/Lessons/Language_Arts/Speech/SPH Delivering a Persuasive Speech
http://www.studyguide.org/cm101_persuasive_speech.html A study guide for organizing a persuasive speech

 

 

Activity
1. Four classes have been allotted for this lesson and six for the Apply Lesson. Depending on how many students you have, you may wish to change the number of days for each segment.

2. Begin the lesson by showing the students what they have accomplished up to this point; they have written well-organized position papers, have learned how to access the effectiveness of a persuasive speech given in a governmental hearing, and have developed a rubric to rate the effectiveness and accuracy of such speeches. Remind the students where they are going with this lesson cycle and unit; they need to be able to present the arguments and important information contained in their papers in a formal setting that simulates a governmental hearing. This is what the next lesson is and what part of the final project for the unit will be. These next four days are to be used to: 1) reread their position papers and prepare the information to be presented in an oral format; 2) use the rubric from the Explore Lesson to help them create a well-organized and effective presentation; 3) practice giving the oral presentation of their papers multiple times before different students to get feedback and also just on their own to be familiar with their information and confident in their delivery.

3. You may wish to consult the following website for specific ideas on how to organize information from the position paper into a format that anticipates a critical response: http://www.studyguide.org/cm101_persuasive_speech.html-a study guide for organizing a persuasive speech. The satisfaction step in the cited lesson suggests that arguments be arranged in this manner: “Statement of Solution, Explanation, Theoretical demonstration, Practical experience, [ending with] Meeting objections.” This order could be used in place of the usual one of beginning with the weakest argument and ending with the strongest, with a special emphasis on the environmental health aspects of the position being presented.

4. Remind the students that giving each other truly critical feedback is much more helpful than rubberstamping a friend’s efforts and not alerting him or her to the problems that need to be fixed. And there cannot be enough practice of one’s presentation given that there are only four days in this lesson.

Embedded Assessment
Student learning in this lesson is evidenced by the amount of engagement each student has with his or her own preparation and how well he or she assists others in giving critical feedback when viewing another student’s practice runs of his or her speech.

Homework
Students need to be ready to present their position papers for the Apply Lesson. If a student was not able to prepare his or her oral presentation based on his or her position paper and practice delivering its arguments sufficiently during class time, then that student must do additional work to be ready for the next lesson.

Embedded Assessment


PULSE is a project of the Community Outreach and Education Program of the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center and is funded by:


an
NIH/NCRR award #16260-01A1
The Community Outreach and Education Program is part of the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center: an NIEHS Award

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Supported by NIEHS grant # ES06694


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Last update: November 10, 2009
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