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Stating Your Position

Author: Catharine Niuzzo Honaman
With content adapted from the following web sites:
http://www.toastmasters.org/tips.asp 10 Tips for Successful Public Speaking
http://www.speechgems.com/persuaders.html A Guide to Persuasive Speech Techniques
http://www.eduref.org/cgi-bin/printlessons.cgi/Virtual/Lessons/Language_Arts/Speech/SPH Delivering a Persuasive Speech
http://www.studyguide.org/cm101_persuasive_speech.html A study guide for organizing a persuasive speech



Time: 6 classes
Preparation
Time:
30 minutes to read lesson plan
Materials: Rubric from Explore Lesson
Each student needs his or her position paper


Abstract
This lesson will afford the students the opportunity to present the arguments of their position papers in a setting which simulates the conditions of a formal governmental hearing on the environmental health implications of an alternative form of energy production. Students will practice applying the rubric created in the Explore Lesson to rate effectiveness of the persuasive oral presentations. This lesson provides valuable practice for the oral presentation segment of the unit’s final project which will be conducted through the government class.

Purpose – This is the Apply Lesson. Students will give their oral presentations based on the information and arguments in their position papers before a critical audience and rate each other’s performance using the rubric created in the Explore Lesson.

Objectives
Students will be able to:
1. Make a formal effective presentation proclaiming the position benefits before a simulated governmental hearing.
2. Objectively rate the accuracy and effectiveness of presentations given before a simulated governmental hearing.

English Education Standards
LISTENING AND SPEAKING
Standard 3: Students will effectively listen and speak in unique situations with diverse audiences.

Teacher Background
It would be very helpful to read the lessons on public speaking from the 9th grade unit language arts units, especially The Three Appeals in Rhetoric and The Powers of Persuasion.

Resource Websites

http://www.toastmasters.org/tips.asp 10 Tips for Successful Public Speaking
http://www.speechgems.com/persuaders.html A Guide to Persuasive Speech Techniques
http://www.eduref.org/cgi-bin/printlessons.cgi/Virtual/Lessons/Language_Arts/Speech/SPH
Delivering a Persuasive Speech
http://www.studyguide.org/cm101_persuasive_speech.html A study guide for organizing a persuasive speech

 

 

Activity
1. Six classes have been set aside for this lesson giving each student the opportunity to make a class formal presentation and be rated by you and fellow students. How many students present in each class period will be determined by the number in your class.

2. As each student presents, all other students need to rate effectiveness of the presentation using the rubric created in the Explore Lesson. It is suggested each student be given a copy of the rubric to use for each presentation and additional comments be noted at the bottom of the rubric. Given the stressful nature of doing public presentations, especially to a simulated critical audience, it is strongly advised the peer evaluation component of the lesson be handled as diplomatically as possible. After each oral presentation ask the class first what the student did well. Compliment the student on those aspects. Then carefully inquire about one area (or possibly two if you feel the student will not be intimidated or discouraged) in which that student could improve for the future. Remind the class of that age-old adage that there is always room for improvement, and it is in this light you are looking for ways to polish an already solid presentation. Of course you are not going to praise inferior work, but seek out what each student has done to the best of their ability and give him or her the confidence to work towards an even better presentation for the final project. It is up to you whether you give each student the rubrics filled out by their peers. If so, remove the names from each sheet. Another possibility is give the student a sample of rubric evaluations, eliminating the most scathing. However, you need to read and evaluate the rubrics for each oral presentation to help you assess how on task each student was during the speeches.

Closure
Now that your students have given an oral presentation of their position papers and have seen and evaluated numerous other students doing the same, each student should have a fairly accurate idea of how well he or she did, their strengths and their needed areas of improvement. For the last class period of this lesson have students do a reflection on their presentations. Ask them to write down their feelings about the public speaking experiences. These sheets can be handed back to students before they give their final project presentations for this unit in the government class. A suggested form for this reflection follows the lesson.

Homework
None.

Embedded Assessment
It is strongly suggested that you use the rubric developed in the Explore Lesson to evaluate students’ oral presentations since this is what they used preparing and assessing each others’ success. Also use the rubrics that the students have filled out for their peers to assess how on task each student was during the speeches.


PULSE is a project of the Community Outreach and Education Program of the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center and is funded by:


an
NIH/NCRR award #16260-01A1
The Community Outreach and Education Program is part of the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center: an NIEHS Award

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Supported by NIEHS grant # ES06694


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Last update: November 10, 2009
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