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Culture & Cycles - 9th Grade Math Lessons

Mathematics provides support in understanding parts per million, an important topic for understanding toxicity in human health. Other topics addressed in the math strand are: Cartesian coordinates, the metric system of measurement, biomagnification, population density, statistics, and data analysis.

Standards addressed by this unit are available on the individual lessons. To reach a lesson, just click on its title.

 

Lesson Title & Description
Objective
Students will:
Class period & week

Calculating Parts per Million: Do we have a problem here?
Students will use unit analysis to calculate parts per million represented by given ratios, and in a given scenario, determine whether the concentration of contaminants is sufficient high to warrant health officials closing a lake.

1. Calculate ppm and ppb by using unit analysis when given a ratio of amounts

2. Determine in ppm what constitutes a health risk for a particular toxin given data

 

1 class period

Where Are We?
Students use latitude and longitude as well as Cartesian coordinates with Mercator and Robinson Projections of the world to find locations or distances traveled.
Day 1
1. Use a grid to apply the concept of latitude and longitude, or positive and negative Cartesian coordinates, to determine the position of an object in the room.

2. Determine the “quadrant” of the earth in which a specific location lies given the coordinates in degrees of latitude and longitude, or in positive or negative Cartesian coordinates, on a Mercator Projection of the World.

3. Find a specific location on a map given the coordinates in degrees of latitude and longitude, or in positive or negative Cartesian coordinates, on a Mercator Projection of the World.

Day 2
1. Determine the “quadrant” of the earth in which a specific location lies given the coordinates in degrees of latitude and longitude, or in positive or negative Cartesian coordinates, on a Robinson Projection of the World

2. Find a specific location on a map given the coordinates in degrees of latitude and longitude, or in positive or negative Cartesian coordinates, on a Robinson Projection of the World

3. Calculate the distance traveled between two locations either on the same meridian of longitude or the same line of latitude.

Day 3
1. Find the coordinates for a location of the epicenter of an earthquake.

 

3 class periods

How Big is it?
Students review the units of the metric system, and practice estimating measures before actually converting between the two systems of measurement.
1. Convert from US units of measure to metric units of measure using unit analysis

2. Convert from metric units of measure to US units of measure using unit analysis

3. Determine whether their converted measurement is reasonable

 

1 class period

Biomagnification
Students develop formulas to explain how small levels of contaminants build up and become detrimental to species higher in the food chain.

Use real data to create an algebraic equation.

 

1-2 class periods

How Many People Live There?
Students calculate the population density of a country as a whole and then calculate the population densities of larger cities within that country to demonstrate how population density figures can be misleading.
1. Calculate the population density of a country

2. Calculate the population density of large cities in that country

3. Create an appropriate graph to represent their data for that country

 

1 class period

What Do You Want to Know? - Country Statistics
Activities to collect data and create graphs that best represent specific types of data about a given country.

1. Identify the characteristics of a variety of graphs (i.e. bar graph, line graph, pie graph, scatter plot, population pyramids, etc.)

2. Recognize how the type of data to be presented plays a role in choosing the correct form of graph

3. Create a series of graphs for analyzing and presenting data for their final project country.

 

1-2 class periods

Bar and Histograms
What would You Use? (part 1)

Activities provide opportunities for students to better understand the types of data best represented by bar graphs or by histograms when deciding an appropriate form of display for a given set of data.

 

1. Construct a bar graph given a appropriate set of data

2. Construct a grouped frequency chart for a set of data

3. Construct a histogram from a grouped frequency chart or given an appropriate set of data

4. Be able to determine when to choose a bar graph or a histogram to represent a given set of data.

1 class period



Line & Scatter
What would you Use? (part 2)

Activities provide opportunities for students to better understand the types of data best represented by scatter plots or by line graphs and how to use these graphs to interpret trends

1. Determine the type of correlation, if one exists, between the variables on a scatterplot

2. Construct a scatterplot from a given set of data

3. Construct a line graph from a given set of data

1 class period

What Pie?
What would you Use? (part 3)

Constructing and interpreting pie charts allow students to better understand the type of data that is best represented by pie charts and help them determine if a pie chart is the appropriate form of display for a given set of data.

1. Construct a pie chart given a set of data

2. Interpret the data represented on a pie chart

3. Determine whether a pie chart is the appropriate form of display for a given set of data

1 class period

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PULSE is a project of the Community Outreach and Education Program of the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center and is funded by:


an
NIH/NCRR award #16260-01A1
The Community Outreach and Education Program is part of the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center: an NIEHS Award

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Last update: November 10, 2009
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