LOGO - PULSE



Pollutant Posters

Author: Kirstin A. Bittel


Time: 2-3 class periods (45 minutes)
Preparation Time: None
Materials: Poster or construction paper
Teacher Preparation: None

Abstract
During this lesson students will apply their understanding of weather systems, air currents, and pollution to create an informational poster that will be presented in a mini science forum.

Purpose – To apply knowledge and skills to create posters that inform the public about a specific pollutant and suggest where people with specific respiratory illnesses might want to relocate in order to alleviate symptoms.

Objectives
Students will be able to:

i. Explain how a pollutant affects their community.
ii. Propose one solution to the problem.
iii. Make a recommendation where highly sensitive groups should relocate in order to alleviate symptoms.

National Science Education Standard:
Content Standard D - STRUCTURE OF THE EARTH SYSTEM
The atmosphere is a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases that include water vapor. The atmosphere has different properties at different elevations. Clouds, formed by the condensation of water vapor, affect weather and climate.

Content Standard D - EARTH IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM
The sun is the major source of energy for phenomena on the earth's surface, such as growth of plants, winds, ocean currents, and the water cycle. Seasons result from variations in the amount of the sun's energy hitting the surface, the tilt of the earth's rotation on its axis and the length of the day.

Arizona Science Education Standards
Strand 6 - EARTH SCIENCE
    Concept 1 – Structure of the Earth
        PO 1. Describe the properties and the composition of the layers of the atmosphere.
        PO 5. Describe ways scientists explore the Earth’s atmosphere

    Concept 2 – EARTH’S PROCESSES AND SYSTEMS
        PO 5. Analyze the impact of large-scale weather systems on the local weather.

Teacher Background
This lesson was created with Tucson, Arizona in mind, but issues of air quality affect many cities across the United States. For more information on your local environment contact the local department of environmental quality.

Different parts of Tucson have higher concentrations of different pollutants. Particulate matter tends to have a higher concentration on the Northwest side of town due to the prevailing winds that blow from the Southeast. Carbon Monoxide tends to be highest near 22nd Street and Alvernon due to the high traffic volume. Downtown also shows a higher level of CO (although both locations are below the national maximum allowable concentration). Carbon Monoxide levels are higher in the winter months due to inversion layers. Ozone levels are relatively consistent across the city, but slightly higher levels were noted near 22nd Street and Alvernon and at the Children’s Park in the River and La Cholla area. Ozone levels are highest in the summer months due to increased daylight hours.

Related and Resource Web sites
http://www.airinfonow.org/html/health.html
http://www.airinfonow.org/html/ozone.html
http://www.airinfonow.org/monsites/report.asp http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/airpollution/default.htm http://www.deq.pima.gov/pdffolder/2001AnnualDataSummary.PDF

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Activity
1) Tell students, “Today you will create an informational poster that could be placed here at school to teach other students about pollutants in the air. Tomorrow (or the next day) you will present that poster to the class in a science forum setting. Your poster should include the following information but you may include more.”

• Information you learned about the pollutant this week.
• At least one idea about how the pollutant’s presence can be reduced.
• An advisory to sensitive groups about what parts of town are best/worst for their condition and why. (Make sure to explain which groups are sensitive to this pollutant.)
• An explanation of how different socio-economic groups are impacted by the pollutant.

2) Direct students to the resources so that they might address the local situation. Allow students the remainder of class to complete the poster (and a bit of the next day if time is needed.). If you plan to use a rubric to grade the poster, hand it out at this time.

3) When students have completed their posters, have them present their findings in a brief (5 minute) presentation to the class. They should present the data from their chart and be prepared to answer questions from the teacher and the rest of the class. Groups studying the same pollutant should be encouraged to challenge any points they disagree with. As always, be sure to go over rules for proper etiquette before the forum begins.

4) Have students evaluate themselves on a rubric either graded by you, the class, or you may choose to use the rubric provided.

5
Poster contains all elements required plus additional information. Poster is aesthetically pleasing and includes chart, graphs, maps, or tables to aid in understanding.
4
Poster contains all elements required. Poster is aesthetically pleasing and includes chart, graphs, maps, or tables to aid in understanding.
3
Poster contains most elements required– or - poster not is aesthetically pleasing but includes chart, graphs, maps, or tables to aid in understanding.
2
Poster contains some elements required– or - poster not as aesthetically pleasing and does not include chart, graphs, maps, or tables to aid in understanding.
1
Poster contains few elements required– and - poster not as aesthetically pleasing and does not include chart, graphs, maps, or tables to aid in understanding.



Embedded Assessment
The poster and the self evaluation offer opportunities for assessment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


PULSE is a project of the Community Outreach and Education Program of the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center and is funded by:


an
NIH/NCRR award #16260-01A1
The Community Outreach and Education Program is part of the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center: an NIEHS Award

LOGO - SWEHSC
LOGO - NIEHS Center LOGO - NIEHS

Supported by NIEHS grant # ES06694


1996-2007, The University of Arizona
Last update: November 10, 2009
  Page Content: Rachel Hughes
Web Master: Travis Biazo